Inclusive Tennis at Home

15/02/2021

| News

Anyone can get involved with tennis and that doesn't stop with Tennis at Home. Whether you are disabled or non-disabled, there are a whole host of different ways you and your family can get active at home and pick up some amazing new skills.

The work the tennis coaching community duing lockdown has been incredible. Caoches have been out in their droves producing a wide selection of inclusive content including videos, activities and games that anyone can get involved with at home – especially for disabled people and those with long term health conditions.

Take on a challenge

Who doesn’t love a tennis challenge? The team at Tennis Chesterfield have got you covered with a collection of fun games you can play no matter what equipment you have – you could even use a toilet roll!

See if you can beat your own high scores and take on the rest of the family to find out who the Tennis at Home champion is in your house.

Master your skills

Join the amazing Sue Morrison at LUSU for a series of fun activities designed to improve your co-ordination, balance and ball skills – we’d definitely recommend ‘Wallie’!

The best part is you can play any of Sue’s games either standing or seated. So what are you waiting for, it’s time to get stuck in.

Visually impaired Tennis at Home

If you’re blind or partially sighted, and looking for visually-impaired tennis workouts and exercises, then look no further than this British Blind Sport virtual session delivered by  Middlesex Tennis Open Court lead and Coach, Mark Bullock.

Balance, rallying, ball skills and even balloons – Mark’s sessions are brilliant fun and are the perfect way to get your tennis fix at home.

 

Keeping tennis fit

Don’t forget you can also catch a whole host of seated arms, shoulders and trunk exercises with LTA Physical Performance Manager, Alex Cockram, on the Tennis at Home hub.

In his latest video, Alex is joined by up-and-coming British wheelchair tennis star Abbie Breakwell for a 30-minute strength workout using only household objects.

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