Supported by the LTA's Wheelchair Tennis World Class Programme

scheduleLast updated 12/04/2021
GB RANKING
Great Britain 1
WORLD RANKING
3
CAREER HIGH
1 29/01/2018
DAVIS CUP TIES PLAYED
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Get to know Alfie

Date of birth: 6 December 1997 (23)

Place of birth: Norwich

Lives: Cantley, Norfolk

Plays: Right-handed

Trains: David Lloyd Norwich and Easton College, Norwich

Coach: Donna Andrews/Ben Collingwood

Career titles singles: 34

Career titles doubles: 46

Family: Lives at home with his mother and twin sister in Cantley, Norfolk.

Likes: Norwich City FC

Favourite surface: Hard

Favourite shot: Topspin backhand

Twitter: @alfiehewett6

GB RANKING
Great Britain 1
WORLD RANKING
1
CAREER HIGH
1 03/02/2020
DAVIS CUP TIES PLAYED
--

Get to know Alfie

Date of birth: 6 December 1997 (23)

Place of birth: Norwich

Lives: Cantley, Norfolk

Plays: Right-handed

Trains: David Lloyd Norwich and Easton College, Norwich

Coach: Donna Andrews/Ben Collingwood

Career titles singles: 34

Career titles doubles: 46

Family: Lives at home with his mother and twin sister in Cantley, Norfolk.

Likes: Norwich City FC

Favourite surface: Hard

Favourite shot: Topspin backhand

Twitter: @alfiehewett6

2021 2021 addremove

After reaching the final of the Victorian Wheelchair Open in January, Hewett went on to beat World No.1 Shingo Kunieda on route to finishing as runner-up in singles at the Australian Open. He and Gordon Reid became Great Britain’s joint most successful doubles pair as they claimed their tenth Grand Slam title down under. In March he then defended both his singles and doubles titles at the ABN AMRO World Tennis Tournament.

2020 2020 addremove

Claimed three singles titles, including his fourth career Grand Slam singles title at Roland Garros, where he became a two-time champion. Finished the season unbeaten in doubles competition with Gordon Reid after the Brits put together a sequence of seven tournament victories and 16 matches together. This included their first titles together at the Australian Open and Roland Garros and their fourth US Open title as they completed the career Grand Slam together.

2019 2019 addremove

Won the inaugural Fever-Tree Wheelchair Tennis Championships title at The Queen’s Club as well as the Korea Open men’s singles title and his second straight US Open men’s singles title. 

2018 2018 addremove

Despite an early exit at the Australian Open, he ended January 2018 as men’s singles world No.1 for the first time after the previous world No.1 lost more points than Hewett in Australia. Won his first US Open singles title and his second US Open men’s doubles title with Gordon Reid.

Career highlights Career highlights addremove

Rio 2016 Paralympic men’s singles and doubles silver medallist, four-time Grand Slam men’s singles champion (Roland Garros 2017, US Open 2018 and 2019) and nine-time Grand Slam men’s doubles champion (Australian Open 2020, Roland Garros 2020, Wimbledon 2016, 2017, 2018 and US Open 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020). Crowned Singles Masters champion in 2017 (youngest ever). In 2015, two years after leading Great Britain to victory in the World Team Cup Junior event, he was instrumental in Great Britain’s men’s team winning their first ever World Team Cup title in Turkey.

Early career Early career addremove

Born with the congenital heart defect Tetralogy of Fallot, he underwent open heart surgery at six months old. Later diagnosed with Perthes Disease at the age of six, he started playing wheelchair tennis in 2005. Played his first tournament in 2008 and in 2012 won the first of his three singles and three doubles titles at the Junior Masters in Tarbes, France. Also in 2012, at the age of 14, he won his first international senior men’s singles title in Belgium. In 2013 he led Great Britain to victory in the World Team Cup junior event. 

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